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Nine online moments to bring a smile to Posh fans' faces

We've still got about six weeks - at least - to wait until Posh resume their charge toward the Championship, which is pretty painful for all football fans.
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Posh ground. Photo: John Baker

April 30 is the earliest the league can possibly resume, and with no other sports to fill in the gaps football fans are aching for something - anything - to distract them from staring at the same four walls.

Here then are a few temporary fixes - some moments that you may have forgotten, and others that you wish you had. 

un-Believe-able for Posh

Danny Cadamarteri and Kevin Kilbane both played for in this Play-off final for Huddersfield, who are the only team in history to go 43 games unbeaten including a 3-0 defeat. The Terriers - now best friends with Posh and not bitter at all - were seen off at Old Trafford thanks to a glancing header from Tommy Rowe, a curious strike from the soon-to-be-departing Craig Mackail-Smith, and a trademark free-kick from future gaffer Grant McCann. A brilliant day.

Giuli despatched

A 9-1 win at Underhill seen several times through a window in this game at Barnet's old ground, and on one occasion a goal is missed completely. Anyway, Giuliano Grazioli won't care, bagging just the five in Posh's biggest ever league win, which also saw two men sent off as well. Obviously no grudges held, as Grazioli would join Barnet a few years later.

A magnificent seven

Lee Tomlin was in irresistible form in front of the Sky cameras, as he and the enigmatic Paul Taylor blitzed the Tractor Boys in a brilliant first half - even though Ipswich had taken the lead through a brilliant strike from future Sky pundit Keith Andrews. Ipswich eventually had two men sent off, and by the time McCann and Tomlin had completed the annihilation Ipswich suddenly couldn't get to the A14 fast enough  and that's not something you hear very often.

Hi-viz hilarity

Michael Bostwick was a real star for Peterborough - an inspirational no-nonsense tackler who could be relied upon to command a game from the back and pop up with the odd goal at the front. But forget all that, as his real skill is playing a languid 25-yard pass to a non-committed steward. Perfect, precise, pointless - unlike the game, which saw the Posh complete their usual win at Sixfields

 

Kiss me Darlington

A rainswept Wembley was the setting for one of the final league football matches at the old stadium, as Posh played the team who had finished above them in the play-offs to reach the old second division. Veteran striker Andy Clarke provided the key moment in the 73rd minutes, moment after Mark Tyler had denied Marco Gabbiadini. Cue Barry Fry celebrations and a promotion

Nineties nightmares
For pure hilarity Crap 90s Football is difficult to beat. It does what it says on the tin, showing the very worst of football from an entire decade. If you watch the 9-1 game mentioned above you'll see Mick Bodley smash in an own goal, and here's another calamity for him where he defines the phrase 'going down in instalments'. Or how about the 'finest goal of Drewe Broughton's career' - a backside beauty.

 


Posh's contributions to Own Goals and Gaffs 2 
Pre-Youtube and social media - very pre-, in fact - Danny Baker's videos were pioneering jabs at football and its more ridiculous moments. Quite a few mentions of Posh in this - at the 40 minute mark there are two ghastly own goals, put down to the ground being built on an 'Old Red Indian burial ground'. The rest of the video is also spectacularly good, unless you're Jim Stannard.

Promotion from the brink

Twitter fans will know of the spread of the single word 'limbs' to refer to raucous celebrations - and if ever a goal could be summed up in one word then this promotion-winning strike at Chesterfield's old ground from George Berry was the one. From 2-0 to 2-2, this game from 1991 was hardly a match for purists - the second and fourth goals are pure slapstick to be honest - but the sunshine, the pitch invasion, and the happiness are a joy to see in these troubled times. Long may they return.