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Covid: What tier is Peterborough in and what does it mean?

When the second national lockdown is lifted on December 2, Peterborough will be going into tier 2, Health Secretary Matt Hancock has confirmed.
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What tier is Peterborough in and what does it mean? (Picture: Shariqua Ahmed)

Peterborough will be adhering to Tier 2 rules as of December 2.

What does Tier 2 mean for Peterborough?

No mixing of households indoors aside from support bubbles or childcare bubbles will be allowed, with a maximum gathering of six permitted outdoors.

Pubs and bars will stay closed unless operating as restaurants, with alcohol only served as part of a "substantial meal" until 10pm when last orders can be made, before venues close at 11pm.

All retail, leisure and personal care services are able to reopen.

People will be encouraged to reduce the number of journeys they make and to avoid travelling into Tier 3 areas, except for reasons of education or work.

Holiday accommodation can reopen but people can only stay away overnight with members of their own household or support bubble.

Entertainment venues can open but you can only visit with members of your household or support bubble.

Places of worship can reopen, but people must not interact with anyone outside their household or support bubble.

Fifteen guests will be allowed at weddings and civil partnerships, increasing to 30 for funerals.

Classes and organised sport can take place outdoors but not indoors if there is any interaction between two different households.

Large events including sport and live performances will be open to the public but limited to 50% capacity or 2,000 outdoors and 1,000 indoors.

What happens next?

Once the R rate drops for the area and the number of cases falls, we will be able to move into Tier 1, which allows us to meet with a maximum of six friends or family indoors or outdoors. 

Bars, pubs and restaurants can serve alcohol without the need for a substantial meal but they must operate table service only, and must stop taking orders at 10pm, before closing at 11pm.

Retail and personal care – such as hairdressers and beauty salons – would still remain open, and indoor entertainment venues – such as cinemas, theatres, bowling alleys and casinos – will be allowed to stay open.

In Tier 1, the stay home message is being lifted although people will still be encouraged to restrict movements and to work from home where possible.

Overnight stays will be permitted if they are limited to a support bubble, household or up to six people.

Places of worship can reopen, but people must not interact with more than six people.

Fifteen guests will be allowed at weddings and civil partnerships, increasing to 30 for funerals.

Classes and organised adult sport can take place outdoors, but must follow the rule of six indoors.

Large events including sport and live performances will be open to the public but limited to 50% capacity or 4,000 outdoors and 1,000 indoors.

What happens if the R rate doesn't drop?

If the R rate doesn't drop and the situations worsens we could move into Tier 3, where you can only meet as a maximum group of six and only in outdoor public spaces – not in private gardens. 

Hospitality will be closed except for takeaway in these areas.

Indoor entertainment venues – such as cinemas, theatres, bowling alleys and casinos – will remain closed.

People will be told to avoid travelling out of the area other than where necessary and to reduce the number of journeys.

No overnight stays will be permitted outside the local area, except for work or education, with accommodation to stay closed.

Weddings and civil partnerships can resume but with only 15 guests, increasing to 30 for funerals. Wedding receptions are banned in Tier 3.

Places of worship can reopen, but people must not interact with anyone outside their household or support bubble.

Classes and organised adult sport can take place outdoors, but people are advised to avoid higher-risk contact activity.

Elite and live sport will still be banned but drive-in events will be permitted.


The government provided an explanation for how it came to allocate each area. For Cambridgeshire and Peterborough it was stated: "An improving picture with decreasing case rates across five of the six local authorities (although the case rate is still high at 123 per 100,000 overall). Case rates in over 60s are also decreasing (58 per 100,000). Positivity has dropped to 5.2%."

The most recent figures have 19 Peterborough Middle Layer Super Output Areas (MSOAs) showing 10 or more positive Covid-19 cases between November 13 and November 19. MSOAs are geographic units designed to improve the reporting of small area statistics in England and Wales, with an average of 7,000 people per MSOA.

This MSOA data is based on addresses given at the point of testing to reflect the distribution of cases throughout the city.

Most areas in Peterborough have seen a fall in the number of new coronavirus cases in the seven days from November 13 to November 19.

In Central Park and Millfield and Bourges Boulevard, however, there has been a dramatic rise in the number of cases. In the seven days to November 11, Central Park recorded 28 new cases, meaning the number had doubled compared to the week previously. The same is true in Millfield; the week prior saw 21 new cases reported.

There are 15 MSOAs that have seen a reduction in the case numbers. These include Hampton Hargate and Orton Longueville, which had 17 new cases in the latest figures, compared to 37 in the week to November 11. Yaxley cases have dropped by 16, and Fengate cases have reduced by 10.

Peterborough's seven day rolling case rate sits at 207.7 per 100,000 people, based on data from the seven days to November 21 where 420 new cases were recorded. In the seven days prior, to November 14, the rate was 214.1 per 100,000.

Data for the most recent four days (November 22 to 25) has been excluded as it is incomplete and does not reflect the true number of cases.


Dr Liz Robin, director of public health for Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, said: "As we now know we will be moving into  tier 2 restrictions from December 2,  it is vitally important that we  now work as hard as we can to reduce our rate of infection to protect those we love ahead of some limited relaxation over Christmas.    

"This means reducing contact with anyone you don’t live with, working from home where ever possible, keeping to well ventilated rooms, washing your hands often and regularly and wearing a mask whenever you are in indoor public places.

"Our infection rates are stabilising or coming down across most areas, so we do know how to respond to this pandemic. We have good plans in place to continue to drive down our infection rates,  working with our communities and supporting people to take the right steps to protect themselves and others. "


Although Peterborough has entered Tier 2, the Prime Minister has promised a relaxation of restrictions over Christmas.

Boris Johnson said: "I know that many of us want and need Christmas with our families, we feel this year we deserve it.

"But this is not the moment to let the virus rip for the sake of Christmas parties.

"‘Tis the season to be jolly, but it is also the season to be jolly careful, especially with elderly relatives."

Up to three households can form an exclusive "bubble" to meet at home from December 23 to 27. When a bubble is formed it is fixed and must not be changed or extended further at any point.